PowerShell Summit


Video: Finding Performance Bottlenecks of Windows Based Systems with PowerShell

Earlier this month, I presented a session on Finding Performance Bottlenecks with PowerShell at the PowerShell + DevOps Global Summit 2019 in Bellevue, Washington. The session seemed to be well received by the audience based on the feedback that I received from the attendees. The video from this presentation is now available. The code and slides used during the demonstration can be found in my presentations repository on GitHub.

My Solution to Iron Scripter 2019 Preparatory Challenge 1

Anyone who has competed in the scripting games before knows that I’m always looking for a challenge when it comes to writing PowerShell code. While the scripting games haven’t been held in the last several years, they’ve somewhat been replaced by the Iron Scripter competition at the PowerShell + DevOps Global Summit and 2019 is shaping up to be no different. Think you’ve got skills? Bring them on! and Get-Involved.

Video: Creating a Custom PowerShell Toolkit to Demystify DSC

Last week, on Monday (April 4th, 2016), I presented a session at the PowerShell and DevOps Global Summit 2016 on “Creating a Custom PowerShell Toolkit to Demystify the Intricacies of Desired State Configuration”. The video from that presentation is now available: Here’s the abstract or synopsis for this presentation: “DSC (Desired State Configuration) can be very complicated when working in an environment where nodes are set to retrieve their configuration from a pull server.

Video: Building Unconventional SQL Server Tools in PowerShell

Last week, on Wednesday (April 6th, 2016), I presented a session at the PowerShell and DevOps Global Summit 2016 on “Building Unconventional SQL Server Tools in PowerShell with Functions and Script Modules”. The video from that presentation is now available: Here’s the abstract or synopsis for this presentation: “Have you ever had records from a SQL Server database table come up missing? Maybe someone or some process deleted them, but who really knows what happened to them?


PowerShell: Output the Result of a Command and Assign it to a Variable in One Line

As of today, there is one month left until the PowerShell Summit North America 2014. I tweeted something out last night and thought I would write a quick blog about it since I often find myself looking for a tweet months later when I can’t remember how I did something that I previously tweeted out. This tweet used all 140 characters that twitter allows: "There are $(($i=New-TimeSpan -End 2014-04-28T09:00-07).Days)days & $($i.