Azure


How many Services does Microsoft Azure Offer?

I’ve recently wondered how many service offerings Azure has. I’ve read anywhere from 150 to 600 and I even went so far as to ask an Azure Product Manager but still didn’t receive a clear answer. What I did find out is that Microsoft maintains an Azure services directory on their Azure products website. I figured that was a good place to start looking and while the website is informative, it didn’t provide a count of the service offerings.

AzureRM PowerShell Commands that Don’t Exist when Enabling Compatibility Aliases in the Az Module

On Twitter, I recently asked if anyone was still using the AzureRM PowerShell module and what was keeping them from transitioning to the Az PowerShell module. One of the responses I received was due to the amount of work and time invested in scripts based on the AzureRM module. The Az PowerShell module includes compatibility aliases for scripts written using the AzureRM PowerShell module. The compatibility aliases are enabled using the Enable-AzureRmAlias command.

How to Install the Azure Az PowerShell Module

The Az PowerShell module was released in December of 2018 and is now the recommended module for managing Microsoft Azure. AzureRM is the previous PowerShell module for managing Azure which has been deprecated but will continue to be supported until December of 2020. Windows PowerShell 5.1, PowerShell Core 6, PowerShell 7, and higher are supported by the Az PowerShell module. Windows 10 version 1607 and higher has Windows PowerShell 5.1 installed by default.

Setting Dependencies on the Azure PowerShell Module

I recently saw a tweet from Joel Bennett about the Az (Azure) PowerShell module being nothing more than an empty module that imports all of the modules for each Azure product. I decided to investigate. Get-Content -Path (Get-Module -Name az).Path | Select-String -SimpleMatch 'Import-Module' Joel’s statement is 100% accurate. Off-Topic: The searched for term is highlighted in each result when the previous command is run in PowerShell 7.

Temporarily Disable the Azure AD Connect Accidental Deletion Protection Feature with PowerShell

You’ve implemented Azure AD Connect to synchronize accounts in your on-premises Active Directory environment to Azure AD. If you took the defaults while running the setup wizard for Azure AD Connect, then everything in your Active Directory environment is synchronized. If you decided to filter the synchronization later to only specific OU’s (Organizational Units) in your Active Directory environment, you could run into a scenario where the number of deletions exceeds the default threshold of 500 objects.

Using Out-GridView to simplify selecting the region when managing Microsoft Azure with PowerShell

You’ve signed up for a Microsoft Azure account and you’ve installed the Azure Resource Manager PowerShell cmdlets on your computer. Install-Module -Name AzureRM -Force You login to Azure from PowerShell. You’ll normally see most people use Login-AzureRmAccount, but that command is an alias (Login isn’t an approved verb). Get-Alias -Definition Add-AzureRmAccount Login to Azure and provide the account login information when prompted: Add-AzureRmAccount Several of the cmdlets in the Azure Resource Manager PowerShell module require a location (a region) to be specified when creating things.

Use PowerShell to Create a Linux VM in Azure

In a couple of my previous blog articles, I’ve demonstrated how to create a storage account in Azure and how to create a reserved virtual IP address in Azure. Both of those items will be used in today’s blog article so I recommend reading through those previous blog articles if you haven’t already done so. The goal in this blog article is to build a CentOS based OpenLogic 7.0 VM in Azure except using PowerShell instead using the Azure portal website (GUI):

Use PowerShell to Create a Reserved Virtual IP Address (VIP) in Azure

By default, the VM’s that you create in Azure will have a dynamic virtual IP address (VIP). Based on this article on Azure, you could simply create a DNS CNAME record for your custom domain and point it to the DNS name that you chose during the creation of your azure VM which should prevent any problems if the virtual IP address happens to change. Maybe you want a reserved virtual IP address for your Azure instance though?

Use PowerShell to create a Storage Account in Azure

You’ll need to sign up for an Azure account if you don’t already have one: https://azure.microsoft.com. There’s a free trial if you want to try it out. One thing I would suggest if you’ve never used Azure is to spend a little time in the GUI (your Azure account’s portal website) learning about it before you start trying to manage it with PowerShell. That’s the same advice I would give to anyone wanting to do something with PowerShell.