Moving my Enterprise Grade Network Equipment to a New Home

My family has been out of town this week. Light bulb moment! It’s the perfect time to cut holes in sheetrock and drill holes in ceilings to install my home network gear.

When we moved a couple of months ago, I literally threw the network equipment in a closet.


I used the same equipment from my previous home except for a new cable modem. Specifically, the Motorola MB8600 which is gigabit capable since I now have gigabit Internet service. See “Deploy an Enterprise Grade Network in the Home for Less than $500” for more details about my network equipment.

I was concerned that there might be cross braces in the walls based on testing them with a stud finder. I decided to drop four Cat 6 cables in my home office directly on the other side of the wall from my wiring closet. As it turns out, there were no cross braces in the walls.


To keep the cabling as low profile as possible where exposed, I used white Vextra Cat 6 cable. I ordered it from Firefold on a Friday morning with their economy 2-5 business day shipping and it arrived two days later on Sunday.

On Tuesday night, I organized the wiring closet. I decided to forgo a shelf and mount everything to the wall. I used wire to mount devices to the wall that weren’t designed to be wall mountable. I also made custom-length Cat 6 patch cables to keep everything as clean as possible. The Raspberry Pi 4 running Pi-hole for DNS is a new addition since the previous blog article.


On Wednesday night, I mounted the access points to the ceiling. One at the far end of the hallway just like in the other house.


And one centrally located between the living room, dining area, and kitchen.


From my Surface laptop 3, I’m seeing 920 megabits of downstream bandwidth when hardwired.


And 271 megabits of downstream bandwidth from the same computer when on wireless.


Future plans:

  • Install my Obihai Obi200 Google Voice VoIP adapter in the wiring closet.
  • Mount another piece of 3/4 inch plywood on the other side of the wiring closet for future expansion.
  • Replace my Roku Streaming Stick+ with a Roku Ultra so I can hardwire it.

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2 Comments

  1. s31064

    I guess you’re not too worried about heat build up in the closet since everything is mounted up by the ceiling.

    Reply
    • mgama1

      Add a thermometer to the Raspberry Pi, monitor, alert, and determine if heat is a problem. If so, there are multiple ways to address it.

      Reply

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